July 2010


So it came out in the news that the Church of Scientology published an issue of its Freedom magazine, dedicated to “expose” Anderson Cooper, certainly in response to Anderson Cooper’s earlier exposure of the Church of Scientology, in Scientology: A history of violence, which aired on CNN end of March, early April.

This was to be expected. In a policy letter (which is Scientology scripture) of February 1966, Hubbard wrote:

… Don’t ever tamely submit to an investigation of us. Make it rough, rough on attackers all the way. You can get “reasonable about it” and lose. Sure we break no laws. Sure we have nothing to hide. BUT attackers are simply an anti-Scientology propaganda agency so far as we are concerned. They have proven they want no facts and will only lie no matter what they discover. So BANISH all ideas that any fair hearing is intended and start our attack with their first breath. Never wait. Never talk about us – only them. Use their blood, sex, crime to get headlines. Don’t use us. I speak from 15 years of experience in this. There has never yet been an attacker who was not reeking with crime. All we had to do was look for it and murder would come out.

As per its prophet Hubbard, this is the only way the Church of Scientology is allowed to react to exposure, regardless of the truth behind the allegations. Hubbard made it simply impossible for Scientology to reform, as long as all of his writings are held as incontrovertible and absolute truth.

This is why the Church of Scientology published an issue of Freedom magazine “exposing” the St. Petersburg Times, following the St. Petersburg Times‘ landmark series of 2009 exposing the Church of Scientology and its top leader, David Miscavige.

This is why the Church of Scientology published an issue of Freedom magazine “exposing” BBC’s Panorama, following its Scientology and me episode, which exposed the creepiness of the Church of Scientology.

So for those who keep a close watch on Scientology, the latest issue of Freedom magazine “exposing” Anderson Cooper is nothing to be surprised: It’s expected, since it’s mandated by Scientology scriptures.

But let’s go back even farther in time.

Australia, 1965: A thorough inquiry into Scientology resulted in a scathing report, possibly one of the best and most accurate when it comes to understand why Scientology is dangerous. This was the Anderson Report. In its prefatory notes, the Report stated:

Scientology is evil; its techniques evil; its practice a serious threat to the community, medically, morally and socially … Scientology is a grave threat to family and home life. As well as causing financial hardship, it engenders dissension, suspicion and mistrust amongst members of the family. Scientology has caused many family estrangements.

All of the above has always held true, nowadays included, and this shows the excellent quality of the analysis of Scientology by the Australian inquiry of 1965. Mike Rinder, one of the top officials who recently defected, is currently suffering from the same disconnection practices which were exposed by the Anderson Report, 45 years ago.

What was Hubbard’s response to the Anderson Report back then? Here is an excerpt:

The foundation of Victoria consists of the riff-raff of London’s slums … Robbers, murderers, prostitutes, fences, thieves. …

The insane attack on Scientology can best be understood if Victoria is seen for what it is—a very primitive community, somewhat barbaric, with a rudimentary knowledge of the physical sciences.

In fact, it is a scientific barbarism so bigoted that they know not and do not know they are ignorant …

[Ref.: Scientology: Sex, hypnotism and security checks | Sunday Mirror (UK) | 28 July 1968]

United Kingdom, July 1968, in the House of Commons: Regarding Scientology, Minister of Health Kenneth Robinson said:

The Government are satisfied, having reviewed all the available evidence, that scientology is socially harmful. It alienates members of families from one another and attributes squalid and disgraceful motives to all who oppose it. Its authoritarian principles and practices are a potential menace to the personality and well-being of those so deluded as to become its followers; above all, its methods can be a serious danger to the health of those who submit to them. There is evidence that children are now being indoctrinated.

[Ref.: House of Commons // Official report // Parliamentary debates (Hansard)]

What was the Church of Scientology response? In the fall of 1968 published an issue of its Freedom magazine, with “extravagant allegations … which were of a gravely defamatory nature”:

Put shortly, it was alleged that Mr Robinson had instigated or approved of the creation of what were called “death camps”, likened to Belsen and Auschwitz, to which persons (including mental patients) could be forcibly abducted and there killed or maimed with impunity. It was further alleged that Mr Robinson had abused his position as a minister in relation to government grants made to the National Association of Mental Health.The broadsheets containing these grave allegations were each distributed to about 100,000 persons, including people in public life (such as MPs) and editors of newspapers and journals.

[Ref.: Church of Scientology to pay libel damages to former Minister | The Times (UK) | 6 June 1973]

Mr. Kenneth Robinson successfully sued the Church of Scientology for libel.

Just goes to show: Scientology today, just the same as Scientology 45 years ago.

Scientology: Sex, hypnotism and security checks

I am of the opinion that the only way to best understand what Scientology is, is by having an accurate and as complete as possible historical record of all things related to Scientology and affiliated organizations.

In that spirit, I will collect here questions which I believe should be answered by Michael “Mike” Rinder in order to help adding to the historical record.

I will update this entry as new questions arise from reading historical archives related to Scientology. Hopefully, key historical information re. the Church of Scientology will not be lost to the memory hole.

Was the Church of Scientology really unaware of Chuck Anderson’s “knowledge report”?

On June 2, 2002, the St. Petersburg Times published an article, entitled “The CEO and his church”, which main topic was about Bryan Zwan and Digital Lightwave. Excerpt:

[Chuck Anderson] wrote an 11-page, single-spaced knowledge report to Scientology leaders and Zwan, detailing all he had seen the last few months. Anderson wrote that [Denise Miscavige] Licciardi was out of control … Church officials say there is no record they ever received Anderson’s report. “We could spend hours and hours and hours going and checking this to say with absolute certainty that nobody ever got any copy of that,” said Scientology official Mike Rinder. “We can’t guarantee that there may not be a person out there that may have seen something.”

Question: Was the Church of Scientology, and/or you, really unaware of the existence of Chuck Anderson’s knowledge report re. Digital Lightwave/Denise Miscavige prior to the reporter interviewing you, prior to the media becoming aware of the alleged fraud?

Update: In mid-July of 2010, a Declaration of Mark “Marty” Rathbun, in the case of Claire Headley v. CSI, RTC, was released on the internet. Paragraph 27:

… RTC in fact serves to cover up the criminal activity of David Miscavige. For example, Miscavige once ordered me to keep his sister’s involvement in a stock market fraud out of the press. Miscavige’s sister, Denise, had partnered with a Scientologist named Brian Zwan in a company called Digital Lightwave in Clearwater Florida. A whistleblower from the company disclosed to the media and SEC that Denise Miscavige and Brian Zwan conspired to defraud the public by falsely reporting Digital’s production on Wall Street. Zwan made hundreds of millions of dollars by manipulating the stock in that wise. When I investigated and briefed Miscavige on these facts, he ordered that I keep his sister out of the way of SEC subpoenas. I complied. A year later, having successfully evaded SEC prosecution because of his own perjury and because of my work on behalf of David Miscavige, Brian Zwan …

I suppose I can make a reasonable guess that the “whistleblower” was in fact Chuck Anderson. But it doesn’t answer the question on whether the existence of Chuck Anderson’s “Knowledge report” was known by the Church of Scientology prior to the media reporting it, as Mike Rinder told the media.

Where did Lisa McPherson died?

On May 9, 1997, the St. Petersburg Times published an editorial piece, entitled “When did she die?”, in which it is reported that you told a German reporter that Lisa McPherson died in a room at the Fort Harrison, while the official version of the Church of Scientology was that she died on her way to the hospital:

The television interview with Rinder was conducted by German broadcast journalists Mona Botros and Egmont Koch.

During a segment concerning the McPherson case, Rinder said: “The entire subject has become a sordid, sensationalistic media event which is capitalizing on the tragedy of the death of a woman who died in a hotel room.”

Realizing the statement’s implications, Botros asked for a clarification: “In a hotel room?”

Elliot Abelson, the church’s general counsel, responded: “Uhm hum,” indicating the statement was correct.

Rinder heads Scientology’s Office of Special Affairs, which is responsible for public relations and legal affairs.

Question: Where did Lisa McPherson died?

Update: Found a video excerpt of Mike Rinder’s statement, on this site (I converted to FLV format):

I am of the opinion that the only way to best understand what Scientology is, is by having an accurate and as complete as possible historical record of all things related to Scientology and affiliated organizations.

In that spirit, I will collect here questions which I believe should be answered by Mark “Marty” Rathbun in order to help adding to the historical record.

I will update this entry as new questions arise from reading historical archives related to Scientology. Hopefully, key historical information re. the Church of Scientology will not be lost to the memory hole.

Re. Margery Wakefield

Excerpts from the St. Petersburg Times, Oct. 21, 2009, “Chased by their church”:

Morehead said he worked with Rathbun to develop a “blow drill,” a plan the church followed when someone left without permission, which he said happened maybe once a month.

Rathbun oversaw and participated in staff recovery missions.“It all had to do with the hierarchy of how close you were to Miscavige, how much you knew about him and how damaging what you knew might be,” Rathbun said.

From the Orlando Sentinel, August 2, 1989, “Ex-Scientologist risks jail to speak against church”:

Scientology leaders feared that she was a suicide risk, Wakefield said, and feared she could bring bad publicity.

They locked her in a room for two weeks, she said, with guards outside the door at all times. Finally, they took her to the airport, told her to pick a destination and put her on a plane. She went back to her family in Madison, Wis.

In 1981 three Scientologists tracked her down. They took her to a motel and held her there for three days, she said, forcing her to sign an agreement promising not to sue the church in exchange for a $16,000 check. She used the money to repay her father, who had lent her money for “auditing” sessions. …

… However, she now says that she believed the money was for damages, not for her silence.

Question: Were you one of these “three Scientologists” who tracked down Margery Wakefield? If not, did you oversee the operation to coerce Margery Wakefield into signing an ‘agreement’ to not sue and keep silent regarding Scientology?

Re. Digital Lightwave’s stock fraud

In mid-July of 2010, a Declaration of Mark “Marty” Rathbun, in the case of Claire Headley v. CSI, RTC, was released on the internet. Paragraph 27:

… RTC in fact serves to cover up the criminal activity of David Miscavige. For example, Miscavige once ordered me to keep his sister’s involvement in a stock market fraud out of the press. Miscavige’s sister, Denise, had partnered with a Scientologist named Brian Zwan in a company called Digital Lightwave in Clearwater Florida. A whistleblower from the company disclosed to the media and SEC that Denise Miscavige and Brian Zwan conspired to defraud the public by falsely reporting Digital’s production on Wall Street. Zwan made hundreds of millions of dollars by manipulating the stock in that wise. When I investigated and briefed Miscavige on these facts, he ordered that I keep his sister out of the way of SEC subpoenas. I complied. A year later, having successfully evaded SEC prosecution because of his own perjury and because of my work on behalf of David Miscavige, Brian Zwan …

Question: You say accountability — that is, “SEC prosecution” — was successfully averted thanks to Bryan Zwan’s “perjury”, and thanks to your “work on behalf of David Miscavige.” Given that this “work” of your contributed to evade “SEC prosecution” and consequently to have justice being served for the sake of all the investors in DL’s stocks, I am really curious: What were the details of that “work”?

Re. The 1982 plot to entrap Judge Krentzman

In your July 2010 declaration submitted in the case of Claire Headley v. CSI, RTC, you state (my emphasis in bold):

… in summer of 1981 I was appointed to an operation called Special Project. Headed by David Miscavige, our job was to attain an “All Clear” for Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard. An All Clear was defined as a state of legal affairs wherein it was safe for L. Ron Hubbard to return to the International Management Base near Hemet, California with no danger of being dragged into ongoing litigation. For the next five and one half years I worked around the clock coordinating the defense of litigation across the United States and world. The successful termination of said litigation would amount to an All Clear. …

As per the above statement, between the Summer 1981 and Winter of 1986, you worked around the clock to shield Hubbard from being accountable in the courts.

On January 22th, 1984, a news article was published in the Clearwater Sun, detailing a plot to “entrap and compromise a Tampa federal judge”, Judge Krentzman.

Selected excerpts from the article (my emphasis in bold):

… [the 1982 plot] involved an attempt to lure U.S. District Judge Ben Krentzman aboard a boat off the Pinellas Suncoast where prostitutes and drugs were to be used to put the judge in a compromising position …

… confidential sources have told the Sun that federal investigators have been in contact in recent weeks with a former high-ranking Scientologist, a witness whose identity is a tightly guarded secret. …

The witness reportedly was ordered by Hubbard — through another sect official — to use $250,000 to execute the plan to compromise Krentzman because Scientology officials anticipated an unfavorable ruling in the trial, according to sources. …

… One of Krentzman’s more controversial cases was Tonja C. Burden vs. the Church of Scientology, a long and complicated trial which began in July 1980

Miss Burden, then 20, filed a $ million suit against the sect to compensate her for alleged mental abuse, brainwashing, imprisonment and fraud, according to public records. Miss Burden said she entered the Church of Scientology with her parents at age 13 and was for a time a “personal slave” to former pulp science fiction writer and Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. …

During the trial, Krentzman ordered the sect to reveal the whereabouts of the reclusive Hubbard, who had not been seen in a number of years.

Question: Do you know anything about this alleged plot to “entrap and corrupt” Judge Krentzman? If yes, who was involved in it? Who planned it? Who relayed orders? Who participated in it? All the details would be appreciated in order to ensure an accurate historical record of Scientology.

More from Scientology library: Judge Ben Krentzman.

Re. The missing Lisa McPherson logs

On June 22, 2009, the St. Petersburg Times published an article entitled, “Death in slow motion”, regarding Lisa McPherson’s death. The article contains this passage:

In early 1997 as investigators closed in, Rathbun met with church staff at Scientology offices in Hollywood, Calif. They combed the daily logs that McPherson’s caretakers kept during her 17 days at the Fort Harrison.

Three entries particularly troubled Rathbun.

One contained a bizarre sexual reference McPherson had made. Another revealed that no one thought to remove the mirror from the room of a psychotic woman bent on harming herself. The third was one caretaker’s opinion that the situation was out of control and that McPherson needed to see a doctor.

Rathbun concluded the notes had to go.

“I said, ‘Lose ’em’ and walked out of the room,” he recalled, adding that the decision to destroy the records was his own.

Question: Did the logs contain any information indicating that Lisa McPherson was dead hours prior to be transported to New Port Richey Hospital?

Re. “drugs on them that had been planted”

On May 30, 2010, Steven Hassan posted a video entitled, “Megaraid 5-30-10 Hotel meeting”. The video features Larry Brennan, Nancy Many and Steven Hassan talking freely about Scientology, the Moonies, and mechanisms used by cults in general.

At the 17-minute, 20-second mark, Nancy Many says (while reminiscing of her days in Scientology):

… there was a conjunction, in which one of the groups I was spying on, was run by a European group, and Marty did set up some [?] various stings to be done across the border, get people stopped at the borders with drugs on them that had been planted, other nasty things, but he would never listen to my information …

Question: Did you really entrap, or participate in plot(s) to entrap people, by planting drugs on them, so that they would be busted on drug possession charges?

If yes, I am curious about:

  • The names of people who were entrapped;
  • Time of events;
  • Location(s);
  • All people involved in the plot(s) to entrap (Who ordered whom? Who designed? Who executed? Etc.)

What happened to Ed Brewer?

First from an anonymous source:

Ed Brewer is involved in a car accident. Several other Sea Organization or Scientology staff members are in the car with him. He is left in the car, bleeding, while the others go back to the Scientology building to talk to the people in the intelligence division, because they don’t know what to do. They “didn’t want to create a public relations flap for Scientology”. They fail to call for medical help. Brewer literally bled to death pinned in his car.

[Ref.: http://www.holysmoke.org/cos/ed-brewer-death.htm]

Second, from Jesse Prince (my emphasis):

What I heard about Ed Brewer was he was out ethics, and he was with some car accidents and bled to death. It was a problem that he bled death. They didn’t believe he bled to death or something. I know it came up as a big problem when Ed Brewer died. It’s really bad that he died, the guy bled to death, he was in a car, people walked away from him. I remember hearing this story, the Ed Brewer story. I remember hearing Marty talk about it.

[Ref.: Factnet: Jesse Prince interviews – Tape 4]

Question: What really happened to Ed Brewer?

key historical information re. the Church of Scientology